What is the etymology of the word train

what is the etymology of the word train

Origin of the Term Gravy Train as in “Riding the Gravy Train?”

train (v.) "to discipline, teach, bring to a desired state by means of instruction," s, probably from earlier sense of "draw out and manipulate in order to bring to a desired form" (late 14c.), specifically of the growth of branches, vines, etc. from midc.; from train (n.). History and Etymology for train. Noun (1) Middle English, from Anglo-French, from trainer to draw, drag. Verb. Middle English, from Anglo-French trainer, from Vulgar Latin *traginare; akin to Latin trahere to draw. Noun (2) Middle English traine treachery, from Anglo-French, from trahir to betray, from Latin tradere — more at traitor.

Middle English, from Anglo-French, from trainer to draw, drag. Middle English traine treachery, from Anglo-French, from trahir to betray, from Latin tradere — more at traitor. See more words from the same century. Accessed 24 Apr. See the full definition for train in the English Language Learners Dictionary. Nglish: Translation of train for Spanish Speakers.

Britannica English: Translation of train for Arabic Speakers. What made you want to look up train? Please tell us where you read or heard it including the quote, if possible. Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free! You've waited days, weeks, months, even years for What's the difference? Two words of uncertainty. We're intent on clearing it up. We're gonna stop you right there. How to use a word that literally drives some pe The awkward case of 'his or her'.

Can you correctly identify these flowers? Marriage and how to survive it of these things doesn't belong? Test your visual vocabulary with our question Login or Register. Save Word. Definition of train Entry 1 of 3. Definition of train Entry 2 of 3. Definition of train Entry 3 of 3.

Keep scrolling for more. Choose the Right Synonym for train Verb teachinstructeducatetraindisciplineschool mean to cause to acquire knowledge or skill. Examples of train in a Sentence Verb He was never formally trained as a chef. I've been trained in first aid. I'm training her to take over my job when What is the etymology of the word train retire.

My boss is training me on the new equipment. We what to get your sister for christmas to train more nurses. They are highly trained professionals. I'm training to be a nurse. I trained at that hospital. He's training as a chef. She had to train her mind to think scientifically. First Known Use of train Noun 1 14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 5 Verb 15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 5 Noun 2 14th century, in the meaning defined above.

Learn More about train. Time Traveler for train The first known use of train was in the 14th century See more words from the same century.

From the Editors at Merriam-Webster. Trainspotting Trainspotting The practice of watching trains, particularly as a hobby. Why do we call it a 'train'? The 'clothing' meaning came first. Dictionary Entries near train trail spade trail teamster trailway train trainasium trainband trainbearer See More Nearby Entries.

Phrases Related to train commuter train express train freight train goods train in train in training passenger train. Statistics for train Look-up Popularity. Style: MLA. More Definitions for train. English Language Learners Definition of train.

Kids Definition of train Entry 1 of 2. Kids Definition of train Entry 2 of 2. Other Words from train trainer noun. Comments on train What made you want to look up train? Show Comments Hide Comments. Get Word of the Day daily email! Test Your Vocabulary. Test your visual vocabulary with our question challenge! Anagram puzzles meet word search. Love words? Need even more definitions? We're intent on clearing it up 'Nip it in the butt' or 'Nip it in the bud'?

We're gonna stop you right there Literally How to use a word that literally drives some pe Is Singular 'They' a Better Choice? Take the quiz Name That Thing Test your visual vocabulary with our question Play the game.

Origin of the Word Gravy

Train -: The word train also happens to come from two languages i.e. Old french word trahiner and Latin word trahere which means to "pull/draw". Related Questions More Answers Below. Jun 22,  · Origin of the Term Gravy Train as in “Riding the Gravy Train?” June 22, By EricT_CulinaryLore The name of a dog food and the subject of at least one blues song by W.C. Handy, gravy train is a slang term which refers to easy money that . to make proficient by instruction and practice, as in some art, profession, or work: to train soldiers. to make (a person) fit by proper exercise, diet, practice, etc., as for an athletic performance. .

The name of a dog food and the subject of at least one blues song by W. Handy, gravy train is a slang term which refers to easy money that just keeps on rolling in, with little effort required. Say, for instance, you receive a large inheritance from a mysterious relative, which comes in monthly installments: You are riding the gravy train. Where did we get this curious idiom?

The modern v was written as u in Medieval manuscripts and could be difficult to distinguish from n. The usual suggestion is that it derived from the Latin word granum , meaning grain, which became the Old French and the English word grain , with grain, in Old French, meaning spice. By the 16th century, the term somehow came to be known as a sauce made from meat drippings. However, neither the word gravy or sauce is Italian but Italian-American and both were adopted, depending on preference, by Italians immigrating to America.

Despite the passionate protest of people on either side of the discussion, such a debate probably does not exist in Italy and seems to be centered in the Mid-Atlantic Italian-American community. Gravy, to be clear, is an English word. Just why it came to be used by Italian-Americans, we cannot be certain. It is neither correct nor incorrect but is simply a matter of upbringing and preference.

Gravy may have simply fit the bill for Italian emigrants describing something that started with meat drippings and was slow-cooked with different meats, tomato, etc. However, one possible reason for the adoption of the word gravy, and the reason I bring it up here is that the word gravy did indeed refer to a sense of plenty, in America. Author David Gentilcore brought this up as one idea among many in his book Pomodoro!

Regardless of whether you think of gravy as a rich meat-based tomato sauce, or, as do most Americans, as a thick brown sauce made from pan drippings, especially good with biscuits, there is no disputing that we all love our gravy.

When you combine gravy with train , then, you get the idea of easy money that keeps on coming in, with little effort on your part. A gravy hauler was a truck driver who would only drive high-paying runs. This article contains one or more Amazon affiliate links. See full disclosure. All Rights Reserved. Please contact for permissions. Related Articles. By continuing to use this website, you agree to their use.

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