How to take care of stock flowers

how to take care of stock flowers

How To Grow Stock Flower (Matthiola Incana, Gillyflower, Perfume Plant)

Sep 03,  · Stock flowers bloom from spring to summer, offering continuous blooms in the sunny garden when given the right stock plant care. Caring for stock plants includes growing them in well-draining soil. Keep the soil moist and deadhead spent blooms. Grow this plant in a protected area in colder areas and mulch to protect roots in winter. Chilling Stock for Flowers. Growing stock is Estimated Reading Time: 2 mins. Caring for stock plants includes growing them in well-draining soil. Keep the soil moist and deadhead spent blooms. Grow this plant in a protected area in colder areas and mulch to protect roots in winter.

Learn which plants thrive in your Hardiness Zone with our new interactive map! Stock, also known as Matthiola, is a hardy cool-season annual native to the Mediterranean and a favorite in old-fashioned cottage gardens. The tightly clustered flowers come in shades of white, pink, red, cream, peach, yellow, lilac or purple, oc may be ov or double. Because of their sweet and spicy fragrance, spikes of stock blossoms are often sold as a cut flower. The most commonly planted forms are common stock Matthiola incanawhich ranges from 8 to 30 inches tall, and evening-scented stock Matthiola longipetala bicornuswhich is 12 to what does nt mean in garmin maps inches tall.

Start seeds indoors in a sunny spot six to eight weeks before the last frost. Plant seeds in a well-draining potting mix, as stock is susceptible to rot, or damping-off. Water from below just enough to keep the potting mix moist. The best temperature for germination is 55 to 65 degrees. Press the seeds lightly on the planting mix, but don't bury them, as they need light to germinate. Locate a spot in full sun to partial shade. Using a trowel or spade, prepare takw garden soil by amending it with organic matter such as shredded leaves or a light compost.

Stock prefers a light, fertile soil with good drainage. Space seedlings find out what video card my computer has nursery plants 10 to 15 inches apart, and plant at the same level they were growing in their pots.

Water well after planting. Keep the soil moist throughout the growing season, but do not overwater, as stock is prone to root rot. Plant seedlings or nursery-grown plants outside in the early spring in cold weather climates. Stock blooms best in cool weather, so plant early to get maximum enjoyment from the flowers before warm weather arrives. Plant in the early fall in climates kf a milder winter, for bloom in winter or early spring. Stock will withstand moderate frost, but will not set bloom if temperatures too cold at night.

Fertilize monthly with an hoe fertilizer intended for annual flowers. Using pruning shears, deadhead stock when flower spikes are done blooming. This needs to be done only to keep the plants looking neat, as the double-flowered stocks do not produce seed.

Purchase stock when half to two-thirds of the flowers on the stalk are open. Look for straight, sturdy stems, and avoid stems on which the lower flowers are decaying. Remove any foliage that will be below the water line of the vase or container. For longest flower life, cut the stem under water and use a floral preservative. Change the water of your stock bouquet daily because stock is susceptible to mildew, FloralDesignInstitute. Place stock plants in a raised bed to improve drainage if you live in an area that receives heavy winter rains.

Gwen Bruno has been a full-time freelance writer sincewith her gardening-related articles appearing on DavesGarden. She is a former teacher and librarian, and she holds a bachelor's degree in education from Augustana College and master's degrees in education and library science from North Park University and the University of Wisconsin. Share this article. Tip Place stock plants in a raised bed to improve drainage if you live in an area that receives heavy winter rains.

Matthiola incana Plant Facts

Aug 10,  · To experiment with growing stock in various plant hardiness zones, consider starting seeds indoors, using cold frames or greenhouses, and providing shade from intense afternoon heat. Matthiola incana Plant Facts Average moisture, well-drained soil Cool weather to set budsEstimated Reading Time: 3 mins. Care for Stock Flower. Stock flowers need very little care once established. Water is needed during dry periods or drought, but usually, rainwater will suffice. Fertilize once per month with a general purpose fertilizer for flowering plants. Deadhead the flower heads during the blooming season to encourage new growth and an elongated blooming zi255.comted Reading Time: 7 mins. Always use warm ( – degree) clean water as most flowers take in warm water more efficiently than cold. The actual quality of water used in a vase plays a major role in a flowers life cycle as examples; Sodium - Present in high concentrations in soft water, particularly if softened using salt, is toxic to roses and carnations.

Stock also called Matthiola incana, Gillyflower, perfume plant is one of the most fragrant flowers you can grow. Its scent is described as both sweet and spicy, not to mention incredibly pleasant. Stock flowers are quite hardy and sturdy, making them a great choice for containers or for planting directly into your garden beds. Stock is a cool weather flower that blooms from early spring into summer. The summer heat stops stock from blooming, as it needs temperatures of 60 degrees Fahrenheit or lower in order to produce blossoms.

Stock is planted as an annual, biennial, or perennial, depending on the region where they will be grown. In colder climate areas, stock flowers are planted as annuals, as they will not survive more than the first few frosts.

In warmer climates, stock is considered a perennial, as the hardy plants can survive for several years, coming back with sturdier, woodier stems each year, until the summer heat eventually takes its toll. Stock can be considered a biennial because it has a tendency to bloom and set seed in its second year. The flowers range in color from basic shades of white, pink, lavender, and rose as well as coming in deeper jewel tones of red, purple, and blue.

There are dwarf varieties that only grow to be eight to twelve inches tall and larger varieties that can grow two to three feet. But what it lacks in pretty plumage, it makes up for in its unique perfume. The stock flower has been bred and cultivated to create more size and color varieties.

There are now more than 60 known cultivars of stock flower to choose from. Here are a few standouts that we think you will enjoy. Producing large, sweet-smelling double blooms on single stems, this stock hybrid comes in a eye-grabbing pure white tint with a yellowish-green center. This series of hybrids are a perfect example of why stock flowers have risen in popularity. Available in all the major colors that traditional stock flowers are offered in, the Cinderella cultivar is unique because, in such a small package, it produces nothing but double blooms.

Cinderellas are a great choice to position in nose-high containers or as border flowers for larger perennial garden beds. Stock flowers prefer full sunlight exposure, but they will tolerate partial shade in the right climates. Stock thrives in rich, loose soil that drains well.

These flowers need to be fed once right after planting, and then once per month, using a general purpose fertilizer for flowering plants. Stock flowers can be planted from seedlings or seed, though planting them from seedlings has a higher success rate. If you choose to go with seedlings, dig out holes large enough to place the seedlings in, and plant them just two inches below the soil, where the crown of the plant is just beneath soil level.

Give at least 15 centimeters of space between the plants on all sides. Cover very lightly with less than a half inch of fine garden soil or potting mix. Water the young plants thoroughly and often until stems begin to sprout up, then water only twice per week. Transplant stock into the garden after the last frost date has passed, spacing each plant out about seven to 12 inches apart.

Plant stock in full sun except for in very hot climates, where the flowers would enjoy a bit of afternoon shade. If you are worried about soil quality, layer in plenty of well-rotted organic matter. Stock flowers need very little care once established. Water is needed during dry periods or drought, but usually, rainwater will suffice. Fertilize once per month with a general purpose fertilizer for flowering plants. Deadhead the flower heads during the blooming season to encourage new growth and an elongated blooming period.

There are no major issues with pests or diseases with stock flower. However, if any problems do arise, they should be easily treated with a insecticide, fungicide or repellents as needed. For the perfect cottage flower garden, pair stock flowers with heliotrope and phlox. These three will also partner perfectly as cut flowers for indoor arrangements.

Another great pairing for stock flowers is nemesia. These two flowers will make a lovely pair throughout the spring, and in the summer, when the stock blooms stop popping, nemesia will continue to flourish and carry the load in their absence.

For a duo that will will bloom all spring long and then fade together, try stocks with pansies. When they have both gone dormant, tear them up and replant with warm season annuals, such as marigolds or petunias.

A great combination for fragrance is a mixture of stock and sweet pea flowers. Sweet peas can be grown as annuals or perennials, bearing big ruffled blooms in tons of different colors. Most types of sweet pea flowers have a strong bouquet as well, and pairing them with stocks could give you the sweetest smelling garden in your neighborhood.

Stock flower is a natural for indoor arrangements. The flower retains its shape and color long after it has been separated from the plant base and root system. Not only do stock flowers look excellent in a vase, the cut blooms continue to relinquish an amazing fragrance to enjoy indoors.

Here are a few tips for getting the most out of your cut flower arrangements : Remove leaves from the bottom of the stems. This way, the plant is not spending precious energy on trying to keep hidden leaves looking healthy and instead will focus on the blooms up top that you want to stick around as long as possible.

Replace the water every day to retain freshness. When changing the water, snip the bottom of the stems each day. Use a fertilizer specifically engineered for cut flowers, and just add it to the water. The better you take care of your arrangements after you cut them, the longer they will last to fill your home with beauty and joy.

Watch this video for a quick tutorial on how to grow stock at home:. Watch this video to learn about stock culture, get some growing tips and learn how many growers are using their stock flowers to make perfume:. This video will teach you how to propagate stock plants from seed:. Can you tell me where to purchase the spray stock seed?

Your email address will not be published. Notify me of follow-up comments by email. Notify me of new posts by email. Our gardening obsessed editors and writers choose every product we review. We may earn an affiliate commission if you buy from one of our product links, at no extra cost to you. Varieties of Stock Flower The stock flower has been bred and cultivated to create more size and color varieties.

Growing Conditions for Stock Flower Stock flowers prefer full sunlight exposure, but they will tolerate partial shade in the right climates. Comments Do deer eat stock? Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your email address will not be published.

Privacy Policy. Affiliate Disclosure Our gardening obsessed editors and writers choose every product we review.

1 thoughts on “How to take care of stock flowers

Add a comment

Your email will not be published. Required fields are marked *