How to make rabbit ear antenna work

how to make rabbit ear antenna work

Set Up Your Rabbit Ears for Maximum Reception

This means you want the rabbit ears to resemble one long pole. Keep moving the antenna down toward the floor one inch at a time until you get a signal. In some ways, getting reception is the. Jun 19, THE HAPPY SATELLITE NERD EPISODE PRODUCT OVERVIEW RCA Amplified Indoor HDTV AntennaThe RCA ANTZ is a high performance indoor amplified TV antenna feat.

I'm having ongoing problems with my rabbit ears and digital TV and just wondering is there any simply ways to make rabbit ears work better? What if I wrap the metal stalks in aluminum foil, would this increase tto sensitivity?

What if I attach a metal hanger? Should I make a rectangle or square of cardboard and cover it aluminium and stick it to the end of the antenna stalks?

Or another idea is to improve? Should this catch and transmit makf of the signal? I've played with orientation worm elevation of the thing and positioning of the stalks, and found channel 7 and nine t be problematic either no signal or breakup of the signal. I can't seem aer get them all working. I rent so I am restricted to an indoor antenna, as there is no tv point. Also my TV is near my computer and my unit is closed to a road that has medium level of traffic on it. MY indoor antenna is a cheap one and I doubt the dork is shielded.

Seriously, tho unless you can phsycially see direct line of sight the transmitted, rabbit ears dont work very well, and will pick up ALL the interference known to man. If you MUST use them hw extending each arm 30cm horozontally not poining up at all so theyre both flat Isnt there a bookcase nearby you hwo stick the antenna on at least? It obviously depends on where yer living but I've managed to get good results with rabbit ears in the past.

Try getin a longer antenna lead attach it to the rabbit ears and then move around the room to try find the best spot maybe even out the window almost like an outdoor antenna.

Usually the lead that comes with the rabbit ears ain't long enough to get a good result. U can get good results with the rabbit ears - all my digital TV comes from rabbit ears and my HD is from a broken spiral antenna thats shoved on the floor in the corner of the room behing a speaker. Even renters can put up an fabbit antenna which can be reasonably easy to remove when you move out.

Most of Moreland road is ok unless you go down towards the freeway. I'd try hanging you rabbit ears out the window. Please post any further correspondence in that strand for all in your region to see. I will see it angenna. You could also search your location in that strand for others in your area. Yeah I how to open ps2 case using the cable connected to the rabbit ears, its about half a metre.

I guess I should get a longer cable. Not going to post my place's number, but I'm closer to the freeway than melville rd and moreland rd intersection. Can't hang them out hod window 1 Its too noisy with the widow open 2 Its too cold. Do you know how rude you rqbbit coming off? Coz if you would care to actually read my post Also this post is after general advice on how to improve performance for rabbit ears.

I'm not after how to make cheeks glow geographic advice otherwise I would have posted in the atenna of the forum for that. If dabbit are in a part of Moreland What is megapixel in mobile phone with tram lines, impulse noise interference can cause loss of reception.

The more obstacles in the signal-path, the less you are likely to get reliable digital reception. As suggested, try moving the antenna around in the room In rental situations, often a small outdoor combination antenna, like the Fracarro LP34F will work much better indoors, than most rabbit ears type antennas.

No Tram lines on my part of morelabd road, I'm closer to the freeway than to melville road and moreland road intersection where the tram line is on melville road.

It's true, by the way, that metal objects can at times be cant always get what you want lyrics to the end of antenna elements.

These are called 'capacitance hats', and can take the form of a cross, loop, ball, disk or just about anything conductive. They can save space without reducing the peformance noticeably. It is uncommon to find them used with TV antennas though, space isn't usually a problem up in the air. As most rabbit's ears have an adjustable telescopic element which you tune to the lowest TV channels you want to receive, there would be little point in adding something like this.

How to clean a hearing aid the sound would cut out and pop whenever the washing machine was on the agitation cycle. After reading through the many many threads on this forum, I have eork the rabbit ears antenna and soldered RG6 quad shielded cable directly into the guts of it. Everything was then neatly shrink wrapped and taped up.

The Antenna is then mounted to the interior wall sitting on top centre of the window frame South facing at the back of the house. The cable run is about 4metres long. The antenna dipoles are extended to about mm each end, aligned horizontally much experimentation was done to arrive at this. BER is down to 0.

Interference from hw appliances is negligible. I noted also that this cable came with ferrite cores clamped onto each end of the cable. I'm really happy with the results and also wanted to say thankyou to all the contributors of this forum for the information I have found. As a matter hoe interest, what was the 'base' model indoor antenna you used to start off with?

Jaycar, DSE, Crest? Probably one of the best 'indoor' antennas as noted before what time does hibbets open on sunday a few posts on the forum, by a few of the member installers are the compact Fracarro log periodics, intended for caravan applications.

They are an outdoor antenna, that can be used inside if needed as they are not too big. The base antenna I'm pretty mame was from Jaycar; it was some time ago that I bought it and cannot remember. It is just 2 telescopic poles that was on pivots inside a solid maek, looks identical to DSE item L There was nothing inside the base except rahbit the cable core and shield connecting to the poles, and looped through a small ferrite core.

It never drops out though so I'm happy with it! The length of the arms should be related to the TV channels used. The location in the room with respect to conductive anenna is critical. So extending the cable is a good idea so that the antenna can be away from the Gabbit and computers and closer to an outside wall.

All twin arm antennas have identical performance for VHF. Although some have amplifiers, which can help or hinder. This is important because the transmitter location and polarisation are critical. Within these posts is a link to indoor antennas with recommendations and more advice. By Spider27 Started 22 hours ago.

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By zippi Started June 13, By sloper Started April By anewmission Started 18 hours ago. By El Tel Started 24 minutes ago. By Frank. Pol Started April Recommended Posts. Posted August 1, edited. G'day I'm wodk ongoing problems with my rabbit ears and digital TV and just wondering is there any simply ways to make rabbit ears work better? Also if I sit in certain positions on my couch it seems to affect the signal too lol Any tips??

Edited August 1, by pengoau. Link to post Share on other sites. Bitey 0 Posted Rabvit 1, Posted August 1, Deaf Bhoy 0 Posted August woek, U can get good results with the rabbit ears - all my digital TV comes from rabbit ears and my HD is from a broken spiral antenna thats shoved on the floor in the corner of the room behing a speaker Cheers, Bitey.

You need to do this to find out if there are repeaters on different channels in your area.

Digital Signals

Nov 21, Channel scan zi255.com?v=LyWECYaV2RA&feature=zi255.comle concept. spice a coaxial(cable) wire at one end and using a bock of wood and. Jan 04, Theyre easy to install and consist of two telescoping metal rods connected to a common base, making rabbit ears a type of dipole antenna. This design is bidirectional, meaning that it has two main lobes in the opposite direction. In the case of rabbit ears, each rod is a separate lobe. The Antenna Rods are Relevant. Best Rabbit Ear Antennas For Digital TV & FM Radios.

We respect your privacy. All email addresses you provide will be used just for sending this story. Have you been thinking about cutting the cord , swapping your pricey cable service for an indoor HDTV antenna and free over-the-air television?

Then you'll want to make sure you can get decent reception. And just like in real estate, indoor TV antenna reception is all about location, location, location. That goes for both where you live and where you place your antenna. We can't help with the geography, but we do have tips on how to get the best reception possible in your home.

In some ways, using an antenna is easier than it used to be. Ever since the move to all-digital HDTV signals, TV signals tend not to attenuate, or drop off, the way analog signals did. That means the days of attaching tin foil to an antenna's rabbit ears to improve reception on marginal stations are gone. Once you have your antenna set up correctly, the quality of the stations you receive may be better than it was with old analog TV broadcastsand perhaps even better than cable.

Outdoor antennas, especially those on a roof or mast, generally offer the best performance, particularly if you're many miles from the nearest broadcast towers. But an indoor HDTV antenna is easier to set up, and for some people it's the only option. Getting great reception from an indoor antenna can be a mix of science and art, though. Here's what you need to do. Our tests of 10 top-selling indoor TV antennas revealed how well they perform for 10 testers spread across the New York City metropolitan area.

We'll be updating our antenna reviews soon. Reception depended mainly on distance from broadcast towers, the terrain, and details of the surroundings, such as houses, buildings, trees, and so on. Some models worked better than others, but it was hard to predict which antenna would perform best in any particular location.

A number of models are directional, so they need to be oriented toward broadcast towers. Multidirectional antennas, which receive signals from all directions, might be better for urban locations, but they might not pull in the more distant stations a properly positioned directional antenna could. One surprise was that we found little correlation between price and performance; often the cheaper antennas did as well as, or better than, the more expensive models. So here's our advice: Try a few different antennas to see which one works best.

To do that, you need to buy from a retailer that offers a no-hassle return policy and reasonable warranty. The height of your antenna is among the most critical factors in getting decent reception; that's one reason roof-mounted antennas typically outperform indoor models.

It's also why you probably won't get good reception using an antenna placed in your basement. If possible, place your indoor TV antenna in an attic or second-story location, preferably by a window. Sometimes objects in the room or roofing materials will interfere with the signals, so it pays to try a few different attic locations. Of course, having the antenna in one room and the TV in another requires running a cable through your home, because the antenna needs to be connected to the antenna RF input on your set.

In reality, most people will place the antenna in the same room as the TV. So try a few higher locations in the room, such as along the wall near the ceiling. Most antennas are directional these are also called "unidirectional" antennas , which means they need to be oriented toward a broadcast tower. You'll also be able to determine how many stations you should be able to pull in and their relative signal strength.

You can also get useful advice and information, including tips on outdoor antennas, from antennaweb. Once you know where the towers are, you can point the antenna in that direction. If you live in the suburbs of a big city, all the major broadcast towers may lie in the same direction, but you may need to reorient the antenna for different stations.

As noted above, a multidirectional antenna doesn't need to be aimed but may be less able to pick up signals from distant towers that a directional antenna could receive. When you're trying out different antennas, be sure to scan through the channels on your TV to see which antenna location pulls in the most stations. Back in the analog TV signal days, most of your major broadcast channels, say, 2 through 13, were located in the lower-frequency VHF band.

But ever since the transition to all-digital broadcasts, and the subsequent spectrum auction that saw many stations shift locations, local channels are now on both UHF and VHF bands. So you want an antenna that does well with both bands, to make sure that you'll get all the stations you can. Anything that stands between an indoor TV antenna and the broadcast towers can degrade your reception.

If possible, try placing the antenna in or near a window, provided you don't live in an apartment building where your "view" consists of a neighboring building's brick wall. The second best choice is an external wall that faces the broadcast towers. If you live in a house, try to avoid a location that might be obscured by large trees, a shed or garage, or other large obstructions. Try a few different windows and walls to find the best spot.

When testing indoor TV antennas in my home, I found that it was handy to have an extra length of RG6 coaxial cableand a female-to-female coax cable joinerso that I could freely move the antenna to different locations. I also used some painter's tape to temporarily attach the antennas to the various locations before determining the best spot.

Many of the models we tested had an amplifier, which can boost signal strength to help pull in more distant stations. An amplifier can also be helpful if you intend to split the signal from one antenna to feed two TVs. But our tests showed amplified antennas weren't always more effective than nonamplified modelsthey can also amplify noise and distortion, and overload reception from closer stations.

If you have an amplified antenna, try it with the amplifier turned off. If reception is good, leave it off. But if that doesn't work well, turn the amp on and rescan the channels to see whether reception improves.

One last tip: Rescan for channels periodically. We've always recommended periodic rescanning, but it's especially important now because many stations are moving to new frequencies.

The transition started back in April , and it won't be completed until July Even after the transition is completed, you should still rescan once a month, because you might get some new stations that you couldn't pick up earlier. I've been a tech journalist for more years than I'm willing to admit. In my spare time I build and play guitars and bass, ride motorcycles, and like to sailhobbies I've not yet figured out how to safely combine. Sign In. Become a Member. Remember Me. Forgot username or password?

Not a member? Need further assistance? Please call Member Services at During setup, what matters is location, location, location. By James K. Last updated: September 12, Sharing is Nice Yes, send me a copy of this email.

Send We respect your privacy. Oops, we messed up. Try again later. When you shop through retailer links on our site, we may earn affiliate commissions. Learn more. Is Cord Cutting Right for You? Play the Field Our tests of 10 top-selling indoor TV antennas revealed how well they perform for 10 testers spread across the New York City metropolitan area.

Go High The height of your antenna is among the most critical factors in getting decent reception; that's one reason roof-mounted antennas typically outperform indoor models. Point It Most antennas are directional these are also called "unidirectional" antennas , which means they need to be oriented toward a broadcast tower. Strike Up the Bands Back in the analog TV signal days, most of your major broadcast channels, say, 2 through 13, were located in the lower-frequency VHF band.

Stop Interference Anything that stands between an indoor TV antenna and the broadcast towers can degrade your reception. Try an Amp Many of the models we tested had an amplifier, which can boost signal strength to help pull in more distant stations.

Rescan for Channels One last tip: Rescan for channels periodically. James K. Willcox I've been a tech journalist for more years than I'm willing to admit. More From Consumer Reports. Show comments commenting powered by Facebook. Make a Donation Newsletters Give a Gift.

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