How to get a mentor at work

how to get a mentor at work

How to ask someone to mentor you

Dec 15,  · How to Be a Great Career Mentor in the Workplace. Importance of the Mentor Role. An effective mentor is a potential difference-maker in the careers of the individuals he/she serves. Many accomplished Why Serve as a Mentor. Recognize That There Is a Variety of Ways to Get Started as a Mentor. Estimated Reading Time: 5 mins. May 10,  · Many professional mentoring organizations will not even accept mentors that are not good role models into their programs. Finding a mentor Consider who needs a mentor in your immediate circle. Chances are you already know someone who could benefit from mentoring. Perhaps you work with entry-level employees who aspire to work in your position.

The first how to change password for wireless internet in this series, "A Guide to Understanding the Role of a Mentor," described bet nature and scope of the role and offered ideas for how a mentor might help you in your career. This how to get a mentor at work is intended for anyone interested in serving as a mentor. Many accomplished professionals point to someone who invested time, energy, and support in helping them navigate a formative point in their lives.

In my own case, I point to two remarkable professionals who invested time in working with me to help me develop as a leader in the corporate world and as a management educator in the academic world. In hindsight, I view those relationships as "forks in the road" on my life's journey, where the support of these mentors allowed me to venture down a new path that would have been otherwise closed to me. For those who have benefited from a helpful mentor in their lives or careers, there is often a strong drive to pay menror forward to others by serving in the same role.

The act of z someone develop, grow, and hkw life and career obstacles is incredibly rewarding. Those who provide this support as a mentor are involved in a selfless act of kindness, with no expectation of return or remuneration. In addition to the knowledge that you gave hhow yourself in support of another person, learning to serve as a mentor is a personal and professional development experience that challenges you to reflect on your own actions and behaviors over time.

Mentors take on many shapes and forms in our lives. From a teacher who pushes us harder to hiw in a subject to a coach who helps us recognize the dedication and hard work it takes to succeed, these individuals were mentors in fact, just not in the title.

You can serve as a mentor from many vantage points in your life and for many audiences. The mentor role menyor charged with helping people think through the larger decisions and directions in their careers. A mentor might offer a rising hoow how to get a mentor at work on developing as a strategist and expanding her leadership abilities. A coach would look for specific behavioral issues to help you strengthen or develop; a mentor helps you with compass directions for your career map.

The act of zt upon both the positives and the negatives supports your own growth and maturation and prepares you to engage with someone who will make their own mistakes as well as create their own victories. Your scorecard has little to do with the near-term progress of your mentee and everything to do with the downstream impact your involvement and guidance offers to the individual.

In many cases, you will never know the true impact of your support. Remember, the relationship is not about you. I have taken on mentees through observing and interacting with individuals outside of my management purview. In one instance, I offered a compliment to a bright young professional after a presentation and this led to a series of conversations that ultimately turned into an informal but long-lasting relationship that has transcended multiple yet and industry changes for both of us.

Some organizations have a very mature process for on-boarding new mentors and will work wwork align them with interested mentees. Take advantage of any and all resources available to support this effort. Consider looking to outside organizations, including not-for-profits, religious institutions, and other youth organizations.

For many of these, you should reasonably expect to undergo a thorough background check before being accepted as a mentor. Start by qt your role and accountability for the relationship and discuss the same for the mentee. Ensure that the individual understands the difference between mentoring and coaching. Ask your mentee questions about his or her background, education and long-term hopes and dreams. Share a bit about your own story; however, do not get caught up in a long narrative about your career.

This relationship is about the mentee, and your focus should be on striving to understand aspirations. A core part of your role is mentir the individual establish the map from current state to desired future or aspirational state. Remember, you are not a daily adviser for q little headache or problem woro mentee encounters.

Your focus is on the larger picture and longer term. Once the relationship has started and after the first few conversations, I have found that monthly contact provides a reasonable balance of frequency and currency.

During your conversations, use more general and open-ended questions to steer the dialog. As examples, consider:. The open-ended questions encourage your mentee to think about and articulate perspectives on important topics, and they offer you additional context for further questions and suggestions.

In most circumstances, you should allow the individual to go forth xt implement their own idea and ask them to share results and lessons learned at a later date.

Serving as a mentor is both x and aork of your own development as a person and a professional. Be careful to not overload yourself with too many relationships: one or two may be all you can handle while maintaining your own workload.

Patience and wisdom are two virtues of the best mentors. Remember this as you embark upon this important endeavor in support of others. Actively scan device characteristics for identification. Use precise geolocation data. Select personalised content. Create a personalised content profile. Measure ad performance. Select basic ads. Create a personalised ads profile. Select personalised ads. Apply market research to generate audience insights. Measure content performance.

Develop and improve products. List of Partners vendors. By Full Bio Follow Twitter. John Reh wrote about business management for The Balance, and has 30 years wwork experience as a business manager. Read The Balance's editorial policies. Your Privacy Rights. To change or withdraw your consent choices for TheBalanceCareers. At any time, you can update your settings through the "EU Privacy" link at the bottom of any page. These choices will be signaled wotk to our partners how long to bake boneless pork loin roast will not affect browsing data.

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Finding a mentor

Here’s how to do it. Schedule an initial conversation. Ask your potential mentor if he or she can make time for an hour meeting with you. You don’t want to be rushed, and you want plenty of time for the other person to ask you questions about your goals, etc. Clearly describe the guidance you’re seeking (The Ask). Nov 24,  · To start with, you as the mentee need to: Be clear on why you want a mentor. Define the type of help you’re looking for in a mentor. Establish goals for the mentoring relationship. Discuss and agree upon the goals of the relationship and what you, personally, are going to do to make it a. Sep 22,  · Don’t ask for mentorship, but follow their work, and be helpful and supportive. Give, and give more. Tweet out their posts, comment in a positive way on their blogs, share their updates, start a Estimated Reading Time: 6 mins.

Wanting to become a mentor is a noble goal, but it needs clarifying. Think carefully about what you really want so you can find the right mentoring relationship. The clearer your goals are, the greater your chances of having a good mentoring experience. Do you want to pass on your industry skills and experience? Are you interested in giving back to your community and helping a young person going through a difficult time? Deciding the type of mentoring you want to do can lead you toward the right mentee.

Also, consider the time you have available. If you have a busy workload, you must be realistic about this. Your mentee will count on you to be there when they need you, although the needs of different mentees will vary.

For example, a child is likely to require more mentoring time than a young professional. Research also shows that young people can have worse outcomes when mentors cease their relationships early or miss scheduled meetings.

You should be honest about your availability when organizing your mentoring position, so no one is disappointed. The best mentors are those that have wide networks for support and knowledge.

Ideally, you should have your own mentor. Some say there is no better way to learn how to become a mentor than to observe your own mentor at work. When we have a good relationship with a mentor, we pick up on the qualities and behaviors that could make us great mentors for someone else.

Focus on building a wide network of professional and personal contacts you can count on. For example, you might start working at a collaborative workspace like a WeWork office. These offices regular host networking events that can help you expand your professional circle. Listening is an important skill for mentors, as their mentees should drive their conversations. A good mentor encourages independent thought and supports his or her mentee, rather than spoon-feeding information.

The best mentors ask questions that can help their mentees discover new things because they know more learning occurs when people actively participate in the process. Active listening is a communication technique which makes sure you hear not just the words a person says to you, but also the complete message the speaker wants to convey.

Studies show that most of us remember between 25 and 50 percent of what we hear. Being a mentor requires a greater degree of engagement than that! Active listening can help improve those dismal statistics. When active listening, pay careful attention to what someone else says to you. Try not to get distracted by other things happening around you or what you might say in response. Once the speaker stops speaking, repeat back what you understood from their words.

This deepens your understanding. Listening actively makes you a better communicator, which in turn will make you a better mentor. Being a mentor can see you working closely with someone of a different generation.

This can be exciting and eye-opening, but also challenging at times. The best mentors do not let these challenges get the better of them, though. While they may not always see eye to eye with their mentees, good mentors know not to judge. Constructive criticism is fine and sometimes welcome, but it should never be delivered with anger or frustration. Mentors are role models to their mentees.

This will establish you as a pillar of your community, the type of person that would be approved for any mentoring position. It will also get you into the right habits before you have a mentee. Modeling good behavior is far more powerful than simply telling someone else the right thing to do. Many professional mentoring organizations will not even accept mentors that are not good role models into their programs.

Chances are you already know someone who could benefit from mentoring. Perhaps you work with entry-level employees who aspire to work in your position. You might also have friends whose children are studying courses relevant to your field.

Some of the best mentoring relationships occur organically through existing connections. If you know the right people, this may work better for you than using more formal channels. There are numerous community and industry programs designed to match aspiring mentors with willing mentees. Search online for programs in your area.

Your company may have a formal mentoring program you could apply for. Some universities and schools also encourage community mentors to form bonds with their students. Some formal mentoring programs have screening procedures to ensure their mentors are in good standing with their communities.

After you submit an application, a mentoring organization may conduct a background and criminal check to ensure you are of good character. You may also need to provide character references that can vouch for your good standing. Only after passing the screening can you progress to the next stage of the application process.

Some formal mentoring programs, including Be a Mentor Inc. These programs feature courses in relationship-building topics like creating trust, handling emotions and conflict, and building confidence.

Through these courses, program organizers hope their applicants will become more successful mentors. In the digital age, more people are finding mentors via online channels. Industry forums, social networking websites, and blogs are all great places for starting conversations with people who may need mentoring.

While the digital world can help bring mentors and mentees together, the best mentoring relationships occur in the physical world. Use your online connection as a springboard for face-to-face conversations. It can be easy to get bogged down in the formalities of a mentoring relationship. Clear guidelines, like how often you will meet and for how long, ensure both parties know what to expect.

However, rules are made to be broken. If you stick to the guidelines too rigidly, the mentoring relationship can start feeling overly clinical and impersonal. The best mentoring relationships grow naturally and respond to the changing needs of both parties. For example, if a conversation is flowing well, a mentoring session can and should run overtime.

If the mentee is facing a significant professional or personal crisis, an extra mentoring session is likely to be beneficial. Mentors play a vital role in educating and supporting people within their community.

Follow these steps, and you could pass on your wisdom to other people in your industry or region. Terms apply. Learn More. Consider what you really want Wanting to become a mentor is a noble goal, but it needs clarifying. Build a wide network The best mentors are those that have wide networks for support and knowledge. Practice active listening skills Listening is an important skill for mentors, as their mentees should drive their conversations. Be nonjudgmental and compassionate Being a mentor can see you working closely with someone of a different generation.

Be a role model Mentors are role models to their mentees. Finding a mentor Consider who needs a mentor in your immediate circle Chances are you already know someone who could benefit from mentoring.

Apply for a mentoring position through an established program There are numerous community and industry programs designed to match aspiring mentors with willing mentees. Pass the screening process Some formal mentoring programs have screening procedures to ensure their mentors are in good standing with their communities.

Complete any necessary training Some formal mentoring programs, including Be a Mentor Inc. Get online In the digital age, more people are finding mentors via online channels. Let the mentoring relationship grow naturally It can be easy to get bogged down in the formalities of a mentoring relationship. Interested in workspace? Get in touch. Notice: JavaScript is required for this content.

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